The Great British Diversity Experiment’s top five findings

Amway, a company that promotes a varied workplace as a method to foster a flourishing economy, is the sponsor of this series on diversity and inclusion. Businesses that value inclusion and diversity are better able to innovate and boost performance. Visit amwayglobal.com/our-story for additional details.

Many businesses claim to value diversity, but how do they do so in practice rather than just on paper?

The Great British Diversity Experiment, an interesting study, was conducted across the UK’s communications and creative industries in 2016. It sought to offer “concrete and applicable insight into why diversity is effective and how to capitalise on it.” The group was motivated by studies that demonstrated the value of diversity to businesses, such as McKinsey’s “Why Diversity Matters” report, which showed that companies with a diverse representation of genders and ethnicities outperform their counterparts by 15% and 35%, respectively.

150 diverse individuals, both participants and mentors in the experiment, were enlisted in January 2016. More than 40% of this cohort was female, and 35% of its members were non-English speakers. Tesco split the group into 20 teams and gave each team the task of finding a solution to the problem of household food waste. The teams then worked on a brief for a month while being ethnographically observed to see what is different when you have a very varied team, both in terms of obstacles and advantages.

Working in a group like this made a significant effect, according to trial participants. One of the mentors, Mel, described working with his team as follows:

“The team’s enthusiasm when they received the brief was humbling. Additionally, each member of that team had unique skill sets and histories in practically every conceivable way. When diversity in a team is celebrated and fostered rather than just accepted, other factors become more important and your personality comes into play. They made up a team that had extraordinary emotional intelligence. Sincerely speaking, I don’t believe I’ve ever been a part of a team—and I’ve worked in a lot of different teams—that was that accepting and so upbeat as individuals. They treated one another with such respect.


Here are the 5 recommendations from the experiment’s report, outlining what can be done right away to increase diversity in the communications sector and the creative industries:

the Great British Diversity Experiment’s top five discoveries on LinkedIn
Amway, a company that promotes a varied workplace as a method to foster a flourishing economy, is the sponsor of this series on diversity and inclusion. Businesses that value inclusion and diversity are better able to innovate and boost performance. Visit amwayglobal.com/our-story for additional details.

Many businesses claim to value diversity, but how do they do so in practice rather than just on paper?

The Great British Diversity Experiment, an interesting study, was conducted across the UK’s communications and creative industries in 2016. It sought to offer “concrete and applicable insight into why diversity is effective and how to capitalise on it.” The group was motivated by studies that demonstrated the value of diversity to businesses, such as McKinsey’s “Why Diversity Matters” report, which showed that companies with a diverse representation of genders and ethnicities outperform their counterparts by 15% and 35%, respectively.

150 diverse individuals, both participants and mentors in the experiment, were enlisted in January 2016. More than 40% of this cohort was female, and 35% of its members were non-English speakers. Tesco split the group into 20 teams and gave each team the task of finding a solution to the problem of household food waste. The teams then worked on a brief for a month while being ethnographically observed to see what is different when you have a very varied team, both in terms of obstacles and advantages.

Working in a group like this made a significant effect, according to trial participants. One of the mentors, Mel, described working with his team as follows:

“The team’s enthusiasm when they received the brief was humbling. Additionally, each member of that team had unique skill sets and histories in practically every conceivable way. When diversity in a team is celebrated and fostered rather than just accepted, other factors become more important and your personality comes into play. They made up a team that had extraordinary emotional intelligence. Sincerely speaking, I don’t believe I’ve ever been a part of a team—and I’ve worked in a lot of different teams—that was that accepting and so upbeat as individuals. They treated one another with such respect.

View this video to learn more about the test:

Here are the 5 recommendations from the experiment’s report, outlining what can be done right away to increase diversity in the communications sector and the creative industries:

Nuclear power could be saved via molten salt reactors.
Modify your creative process; decision-making speed and simplicity are not the primary objectives. The business must “nullify the detrimental impact cultural consensus can have on the creative process” in order to have a more diversified workplace. Divergent viewpoints should be included in the process of reaching a consensus to ensure that merit can prevail.
Change your leaders; if your current ones don’t value diversity, replace them. Only “activity at the top of our industry” will demonstrate the proper motives and bring about long-lasting change.
Implement the Rooney Rule, which mandates that teams interview applicants who belong to racial or ethnic minorities for senior positions like head coaching. Every new position at a company should have a varied shortlist, according to the Diversity Experiment, since “frequently a round peg in a square hole is a good thing.” According to the research, the Rooney Rule should even be used to determine who is recruited to conduct interviews.


Total diversity: Be tolerant of those who have physical and mental disabilities in their daily activities. Look at all groups to achieve diversity. They should have representation in the corporation because they make up a substantial section of the population (10 million in the UK alone).
Entry new tribes: By adding new employees, the company will have “access into new communities and networks,” and this infusion of fresh data, viewpoints, insights, and prospective new clients will keep the company on the cutting edge.

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